Welcome to Wednesday.

It’s not every day that you find a black tech expert who ditched his job to become a comedian in Japan. That’s pretty much Ike Nwala’s life in a nutshell. He’s a Nigerian-American self-taught programmer, raised near Seattle.  In an interview with Vice, Nwala recalls working in computer engineering at Goldman Sachs, learning Japanese and watching comedy DVDs.

Now he’s a Tokyo celebrity. Nwala says he’s using comedy to change the stereotypical narrative about black people and his tech background helps him to do just that.

“If I ever stopped doing comedy here and went back, I’d probably just get back into tech,” he says. “I’m not funny in English.”

You never know where your transferable skills will take you.

Tyler

 

Tech Entrepreneurs Bring the Silicon Valley Experience to Detroit
JOURNi co-founders, Richard Grundy, Quiessence Phillips, and Brian McKinney are on a mission to position the city of Detroit as an emerging market for tech startup education.

KANDIA JOHNSON | BLACK ENTERPRISE

 

$12 Million in New Investments to Benefit Chicago Neighborhoods
Benefit Chicago was created to expand the pool of loans and investments available to mission-directed for- and nonprofit entities, which, due to the communities or populations they serve, often find it difficult to access capital from commercial sources
BENEFIT CHICAGO

 

22-year-old Tech Expert ‘Saved the U.S.’ From WannaCry Cyberattack from his Bedroom
The 22-year-old credited with cracking the WannaCry cyberattack told The Associated Press he fights malware because “it’s the right thing to do.”
ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

The “Silicon Valley” of Lagos Faces Tough Questions about its Future as a Tech Cluster
The biggest question over Yaba, the old Lagos neighborhood that has grown to become Nigeria’s ground-zero for startups and techies, has been what to call it. But in truth, the debate follows the exit of two of Nigeria’s most successful startups from Yaba over the last 18 months.
YOMI KAZEEM | QUARTZ

 

Tech Apprenticeships Bring New Talent into Silicon Valley
Lyn Muldrow is one of 29 recruits in the six-month paid program. All came to tech from different career paths; Muldrow’s peers include an optometrist and a dancer.
NICHOLAS CHENG | SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

 

Get our daily newsletter delivered to your inbox when you subscribe here.