Welcome to Thursday.

If you were ever curious about how you’d look with Asian features or eager to see how Donald Trump looks as a Black man, FaceApp would give you a pretty good idea. Sorry, you missed your chance. The app’s “ethnicity change filters” is defunct. According to TechCrunch, CEO Yaroslav Goncharov confirmed the removal. Back in April, Goncharov apologized for a racist algorithm after users blasted the app’s ‘hot filter’  that drastically lightened skin tones. Four months later and the same result.

When companies take the heat and endure a PR nightmare for poor internal decision making, one has to ask, “Who signed off on this?”. What channels did this product/device/copy, etc. have to go through before the final “okay”? We work in teams, especially in remote settings these days by collaborating with ease in platforms like Slack, Trello, and Asana. How does tasteless material slip through the cracks? There is no slipping. The intent was there all along. You can always count on the Twitter brigade to shut it down.

Augmented reality is the new black (face).

Tyler

P.S.
Tune into #Goals–The Podcast featuring Sherrell in the “Remember Your Why?” episode. Listen here.

This newsletter is sponsored by Capital One.

 

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