Welcome to Monday.

Google released its diversity report back in June announcing an increase in employment of women while the number of racial and ethnic minorities showed very little change. For one employee, Google’s diversity is a hard pill to swallow.

An anonymous senior software engineer aired out his grievances about the company’s inclusion methods and offers up his spin on “ideological diversity.” Motherboard first reported on the leaked internal document titled, “Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber” and Gizmodo later released the full 10-page document.

Here’s an excerpt

“Discriminating just to increase the representation of women in tech is as misguided and biased as mandating increases for women’s representation in the homeless, work-related and violent deaths, prisons, and school dropouts.”

The full report is below.

Even with diversity training, specialized programs aimed at inclusion, and decorative titles for executives in charge of pinpointing hiring bias within companies, how does your company address bigotry? One Google employee isn’t the first and won’t be the last to express prejudice or misogyny.

Keep the conversation going. Check out all of the stories in today’s Hit List and forward to your closest folks, then encourage them to subscribe to ThePLUG. Let’s retool these conversations and offer up fair approaches to the models that will ultimately solidify our internal processes in years to come.

Tyler

This newsletter is sponsored by Capital One.

 

Here’s the Full 10-Page Anti-Diversity Screed Circulating Internally at Google
The author argues that women are underrepresented in tech not because they face bias and discrimination in the workplace, but because of inherent psychological differences between men and women.
KATE CONGER | GIZMODO

 

Africa Entered the Space Race with Ghana’s First Satellite Orbiting Earth
GhanaSat-1 will send a signal to a ground station at All Nations University’s Space Systems and Technology Laboratory. That’s where it was developed by a team of engineers that included Benjamin BonsuErnest Teye Matey, and Joseph Quansah. 
JAKE BRIGHT | TECH CRUNCH
These Fierce Black and Brown Dolls Aim to Empower Girls of Color
It’s a high-tech twist on a growing trend in the toy industry: More dolls that reflect the diversity of the children who play with them.
RACHEL SANDLER | USA TODAY
Flint Mapping Makes City Planning a Team Effort
More than 50 community groups now participate in the neighborhood inventory program. The Community Foundation of Greater Flint is still helping, with the $500 mini grants.
SCOTT ATKINSON | NEXTCITY
He Founded Rooted School ‘For Kids Who Are Really into Tech’
Jonathan Johnson still understands the task won’t be easy, but now the 29-year-old founder of the Rooted School has the opportunity to demonstrate his vision to at least 36 ninth graders when his school opens August 8.
WILBORN P. NOBLES III | NOLA.COM